The Dog Guardian
The on-line version of the RDOC Newsletter

2010

Our newsletters are also available in pdf format for easy reading and printing; you may already have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer, but if not the free software can be safely downloaded from Adobe:   

 

newsletter gif    Volume 12,  Issue 3 – Fall/Winter 2010 ..... in  PDF format   |   in  MS Word format

In This Issue:


Prevent Bites Over The Holidays

By Joan Orr and Teresa Lewin

The holidays are especially stressful for dogs due to changes in routine and the comings and goings of visitors. Many dog bites happen at this time of year. When visiting a house with a dog, children should be taught not to approach the dog (even if the dog has been friendly on other occasions). If the dog comes to them they should stand still like a tree and let the dog sniff. Only if the dog is wagging and panting and coming to them for attention and parent and dog owners are supervising and have given permission, should a child touch the dog. Dog owners should gauge their dog’s reaction to visitors. If the dog is overly excited, barking or growling, cowering away, trying to hide or otherwise showing signs of anxiety or aggression, the dog should be kept separate from visiting children for the ENTIRE DURATION of the child’s visit.  The dog should have its own place in a crate or another room with toys, a bone to chew on and its special bed or blanket so that it can be happy and comfortable and away from guests. Even dogs that seem happy with visitors should never be alone in the room with visiting children.

No preschooler, toddler or baby should be allowed to be near your dog unless you personally also have your hands on the dog and can prevent face to face contact between child and dog and can prevent the child from hugging or otherwise bothering the dog.

Dogs should not be allowed to greet visitors at the door. This is for the safety of the dog and the visitors. Keep the dog in a separate room or crate until the visitors are settled and then allow the dog to say hello if appropriate. If you are not sure about your dog, then leave him confined or keep him on a leash. Make sure that the dog associates visitors with something good for the dog, such as special treats or a stuffed bone.

If you do perceive a problem between your dog and visiting children, this is not the time to work on it. It is not reasonable to use visiting children to help train your dog. Take preventative measures to ensure that your dog does not have the opportunity to bite and once the holiday season is over seek the help of a behaviour specialist who uses positive reinforcement methods to solve the dog's problem.

Summary of Doggone Safe's family gathering tips:

Family gatherings at a relative’s house are the source of fond memories for many. The relative’s dog may not enjoy these events as much as the rest of the family. Noise, confusion and changes in routine are stressful for dogs. Even a normally calm and docile pet may become agitated enough to bite under the extreme circumstances of a boisterous family celebration. Supervision may be lax if each adult thinks that another is watching the children. Children are the most likely victims of dog bites in this situation.

Put the dog in his crate with a favorite chew toy, at least during the most hectic times – guests arriving and leaving as well as dinner preparation and serving;

Assign one adult to be in charge of the dog, to watch for signs of stress and protect from unwanted attention from children. See http://www.doggonesafe.com/Speak_Dog   to learn about the subtle signs of stress to watch for;

Assign one adult to supervise each baby or toddler with no other tasks expected;

If you have multiple dogs, consider kenneling them, crating them or keeping them in another room during large gatherings; and

Supervise at all times.


 

HOLIDAY HAZARDS ARE PLENTIFUL

While Poinsettias are not likely to cause anything more than a tummy upset, there are holiday plants that are toxic and sometimes fatal if ingested.  Some of the more common holiday flora that can create problems include Christmas Roses, Mistletoe, Holly, and Lilies.   

Festive foods that are plentiful and toxic in most homes during the holidays include chocolate. The toxic compounds in chocolate are Theobromine and Caffeine. Symptoms of chocolate poisoning include vomiting and diarrhea, seizures, increased heart rate and respirations, tremors, and hyperactivity.  

Some types of chocolate are not as harmful as others and the severity of the reaction from ingested chocolate depends largely on the size of the pet and the type of chocolate eaten.  White chocolate is the least harmful and dark chocolate and cocoa are the most toxic.  

The Interactive Chocolate Chart on the National Geographic website has excellent information regarding chocolate poisoning, see http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2007/10/pets/chocolate-chart-interactive . You may wish to bookmark this site in case of a chocolate emergency.

Another treat that is harmful to dogs is Xylitol, an ingredient often found in candies and gum, particularly sugar-free brands.  Symptoms of Xylitol poisoning include vomiting, weakness, ataxia, depression, seizures, coma, and death.

Other poisonous foods include alcohol, cherry or peach pits, onions, coffee, garlic, grapes, raisins, raw yeast and macadamia nuts.   

Non-Food Hazards

Remember dogs, especially puppies, will eat almost anything that is within reach.  Holiday lights and extension cords can cause severe electrical burns and/or electrocution. The chemicals inside lights can also cause serious chemical burns and noxious reactions.  

Christmas ornaments can cause lacerations if broken and tinsel and ribbons can become lodged in intestines if swallowed causing life-threatening blockages.  Keep potpourris out of reach as well as some may contain traces of strychnine.

Prevention is the best way to ensure you and your pet have a safe and happy holiday.  Be sure to keep noxious plants out of reach and keep toxic foods in sealed containers.  Most of all, ensure that your pet is supervised when around Christmas lights.

If your pet does ingest food or items that can cause harm, call your vet immediately.  A good resource for additional information is the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals website at www.aspca.org  or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control at 888.426.4435.


 

Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Prep Course & Tests (Ottawa, Ont.)



The next Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Preparation Course at Forever Friends Dog Training will commence Thursday, January 13, 2011. For more information or to register, contact Forever Friends at 613.727-HEEL.

 

 

The 2011 Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Test Schedule is as follows:

February 6

April 3

June 12

August 7

October 16

December 4

The CCGC™ Test scheduled for October 16, 2011 will be offered free to rescue dogs that are awaiting adoption.  Any rescue interested in testing one or more of their rescue dogs should contact RDOC at ccgc@responsibledogowners.ca  to reserve a time.  All dogs must have a vaccination certificate or titer test results indicating appropriate levels of antibodies.  If the dog is successful, a certificate will be issued when the dog is adopted and the owner provides proof of licensing.

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada has CCGC™ Evaluators in Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba and British Columbia.  A list of CCGC™ Evaluators is available at http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/ccgct.html  .

RDOC is recruiting new Evaluators in all provinces and encourages those interested to contact us at ccgc@responsibledogowners.ca  .

A list of all CCGC™ Tests scheduled across Canada is posted on the RDOC website at http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/ccgct.html .

 

Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Graduates

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada is pleased to congratulate recent Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ graduates from Ottawa, Ontario.  

Amy Whitfield and Zeus
Donna Rafalski and Solstys
Soshi Stulberg and Rory
Tippy (Collie Rescue Network)*
Thursten (Hopeful Hearts Rescue)*
     

*   Tippy, a Smooth Collie is currently in a foster home and is waiting for her forever home. For information on adopting Tippy, see http://www.collierescuenetwork.com/ .  

Special thanks go to Forever Friends Dog Training for the use of the school, Donna Rafalski and Finola Pitcher, CCGC™ Evaluators, volunteers Lorraine and Caitlin Green and Teddy, our greet dog.

CONGRATULATIONS!


 

Selecting a Good Dog Trainer or Behaviourist

For most professional fields, there is usually a governing body that awards accreditation.  Not so in the field of dog trainers and behaviorists. So where does a dog owner begin when looking for the right trainer or behaviorist?

dog and trainer gifSelecting a good trainer or behaviorist is akin to choosing a personal fitness trainer for you.  You want someone who has good communication skills, someone who uses tools and training techniques that you are comfortable with, and you would like someone who motivates you.  Ultimately, you want someone who will help you achieve the end-result you are seeking, e.g. a well-trained dog with good social skills.  

As difficult as it might seem to find the right professional, there are some simple guidelines that may help you select a trainer or behaviorist and a training technique that is best suited to you and your canine companion.

 

 

A skilled and competent instructor will:

1.  Allow and encourage you to observe a class prior to making the decision to enroll;

2.  Encourage all family members and others who interact with the dog to attend class;

3.  Provide a clear explanation of each lesson and provide written handouts on how to teach the desired behavior(s);  

4.  Demonstrate the behavior(s) that students will be teaching their dogs and allow ample time in class to begin practicing the day’s lesson;

5.  Assist students individually with proper implementation of techniques; and

6.  Encourage dialogue and be courteous to both canine and human clients alike.

Every person and every dog is unique and so it may take a little effort to find the right trainer.  You will know you have the right trainer if you are comfortable with the training tools and methods used.  An experienced trainer employs humane training methods which are not harmful to the dog and/or handler.  We do not recommend any trainer that advocates the practices of hanging, beating, kicking, shocking or similar procedures/devices that could cause the dog pain or distress or have the potential to cause physical injury. Remember that you, as the dog owner, have the absolute right to stop any trainer or other animal care professional that, in your opinion, is causing your dog undue harm or distress.

A conscientious trainer stays informed about innovations in dog training and behavior modification.  It is always a good idea to check the trainer’s affiliation to any educational organizations such as the Canadian Association of Professional Pet Dog Trainers, Association of Pet Dog Trainers, and/or Professional Animal Behavior Associates, Inc.  Ask if he/she pursues ongoing educational opportunities.

A good instructor will take care to protect your dog’s health in a classroom or group setting.  Ask if dogs and puppies are required to be vaccinated prior to class and, if so, which vaccines are mandatory.  Make sure you and your veterinarian are comfortable with the vaccination requirements.  If not, ask if titers (*) are acceptable.

Current clients are a valuable source of information for you.  Attending a group class gives you the opportunity to ask clients how they feel about their experience, i.e. are they enjoying the class and are their training needs and goals being met.

Because of variables in dog breeding/temperament and owner commitment/experience, a trainer cannot and should not guarantee the results of his/her training.  However, an instructor should be willing to ensure client satisfaction with his/her professional services.

Finally, training your dog is an important part of being a responsible owner/guardian.  It will help you to understand and communicate with your dog.  It will help your dog understand what you expect.  And, it will strengthen the bond you and your dog share.  But most of all, it should be fun for you and your dog.

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada recommends trainers that promote positive, motivational training techniques and can provide a list of trainers that meet that standard.

(*) Titers are blood tests that determine the presence and strength of a dog’s immunological response to a viral disease.


 

Pet First Aid Course - March 26 & 27, 2011  (Ottawa, Ont.)

A certified pet first aid course could mean the difference between life and death!

You are at home or on vacation and your pet suddenly exhibits signs of illness or injury. An emergency can happen any time or any place. Your veterinarian is not available or hours away. Would you know what to do?

First aid is the primary step in any emergency situation for people and pets alike and having first aid knowledge could mean the difference between life and death.

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada will host its second internationally recognized Pet First Aid Course on March 26 & 27, 2011, instructed by Dawn O'Leary, a certified pet first aid instructor with Walks 'N' Wags. The course will be held at Forever Friends Dog Training School, 17 Grenfell Crescent, Ottawa, ON.

The course will cover important topics such as immediate steps to take in an emergency, how to handle bleeding wounds and bone injuries, how to perform Artificial Respiration and CPR and what to do for poisoning and heat/cold injuries. Other subjects in the course include how to recognize signs of numerous illnesses and parasites, with an emphasis on methods of preventing illness and injury for both dogs and cats.

The price per student is $225, which includes all course materials, exam, certificate, beverages and snacks and a lunch on Sunday, March 27thth.  

As only 16 students will be accepted for this course, pet owners are encouraged to register early. If you are interested in registering for this comprehensive pet first aid course, please contact Responsible Dog Owners of Canada at inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca or call 613.228.7764.


 

RAINBOW BRIDGE

We wish to extend our sincere and deepest sympathy to Cheryl Smith of Kemptville, Ontario in the loss of beloved heart dog, Chica and Sharon McKeil and Peter Finnie of Ottawa, Ontario for the loss of their precious Leia.


 

The Cat Has Crossed Rainbow Bridge

by MariLyse Dumas

Note:  This story is about a cat but it could easily be a dog or any pet.  

The CatThousands of pets are abandoned by the side of the road or dropped off at a shelter because their families don’t have time, they aren’t “cute” anymore or they are sick. It is a very sad situation and it happens every day in your neighbourhood in your city, in your country.  The “lucky” are rescued; the unlucky ones and there are millions are euthanized or meet their demise in a less humane way.

 

The phone rings. It is a neighbor asking if I have seen The Cat, a ginger tabby. I reply that I haven’t seen him for over a week when he came to get his food, water and, of course, some hugs.

A feeling of gloom comes over me.  If the neighbor is calling, it is because The Cat has not been home, a term I use lightly, because The Cat basically lives outside, going from house to house for food and affection.

A few months ago, when I saw The Cat, he had a bad injury on his forehead near his eye, an open wound that did not close. I took him in and let him spend the night in the garage. I checked the wound, cleaned it out.  His fur was matted, I brushed him and took some of the mats out. He was very thin so I gave him lots of food and water.

I was on the war path. How could anyone not take care of his or her cat? As cats and dogs are considered “property” I thought I’d better cover all bases. I talked to the owner. The Cat was 17 or 18, was taken in every night (Hmmm!), had been taken to the vet (Hmm!) and was used to living this way.

I called contacts as I thought: “The best thing is to send him to a sanctuary” and was told that at his age, the cat would be miserable and would not be able to adapt. The best I could do was to continue feed him and check him out when he came over which I did with great pleasure. Every time I opened the door and hoped to have his face looking at me and a big meow saying “I’m hungry, please feed me”. Last week, when he came over, he looked very scrawny, did not eat much but did request his cuddles.

Today, I know that the cat crossed “Rainbow Bridge”. I am saddened when I imagine all the ways he could have died but I am relieved to think that he will no longer have matted fur or open wounds and that he will not need to go door to door to get food and cuddles. I am thankful for having known I will miss him.


 

Way to go Andrea!

Last month, Andrea Cormack-Akeson of Dirty Dog Gourmet Bakery (Richmond, Ontario) initiated a campaign to raise funds and purchase pet oxygen masks for the Ottawa Fire Services stations. Today, we are thrilled to report that, with the funds raised, she has purchased 72 pet oxygen mask kits.  Ottawa Fire Services will receive 60 kits and the remainder will be distributed to various stations in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta.

The campaign has been so successful that Andrea wants to continue the quest to outfit every fire station in Canada with the life-saving equipment for the pet members of our families.

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada wishes to congratulate Andrea in spear-heading this campaign on behalf of all our pets.  We also wish to thank Critter Jungle, Ottawa Veterinary Hospital and Gloucester Veterinary Hospital for their assistance in collecting donations.  Both Critter Jungle and Gloucester Veterinary Hospital matched donations made at their establishment.  

For more information, contact RDOC at inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca or call 613.288.7764. A video of a rescue can be viewed at Help Animals Inc. at http://www.helpanimalsinc.org/  .


 

2010 AWARE Festival, Ottawa, ON

The 2010 AWARE Festival was held on October 16, 2010 at the Rideau Carleton Raceway and was the best festival yet.  

This year, the festival included an all-rescue walkathon which raised approximately $1300, entertainment by Dominic D’Arcy and his Rising Stars, and an adoption alley.  

Next year’s AWARE Festival is scheduled for October 8th and will again be held at the Rideau Carleton Raceway.  

A slide presentation of the event, courtesy of MariLyse Dumas, can be viewed at http://rdoc.smugmug.com/photos/swfpopup.mg?AlbumID=14496145&AlbumKey=HmdK5   .

 


Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Winter SolsticeWhatever you are celebrating during the holidays, we would like to extend season’s greetings to all RDOC members and supporters.    

May the New Year bring peace, comfort and health to everyone and their families, including the furkids.

 

 

posted 020111

 

 


newsletter gif    Volume 12,  Issue 2 – Summer 2010 ..... in  PDF format   |   in  MS Word format

In This Issue:

 

A Breath of Pet Air:  Pet Oxygen Masks for Ottawa (ON) Fire Services

oxygen masksAndrea Cormack-Akeson of Dirty Dog Gourmet Bakery has initiated a campaign to raise funds and purchase a set of pet oxygen masks for each of the Ottawa Fire Services stations. She has personally purchased the first two sets and donated them to Ottawa Fire Services.

Each oxygen mask set includes a mask for cats, a mask for small dogs and a mask for large dogs.  A video of a rescue can be viewed at Help Animals Inc. at http://www.helpanimalsinc.org/

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada commends Ms. Cormack-Akeson in this effort to ensure that fire fighters have the proper equipment to save Ottawa pets that have suffered from smoke inhalation, etc. and has agreed to accept donations on her behalf.  

Donations can be made at Critter Jungle, Hampton Park Plaza, 1405 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario K1Z 7L6.  And Critter Jungle, once again, has stepped forward to give back to the community and has committed to matching donations made in the store.  

Donations can also be made through PayPal at financial@responsibledogowners.ca  or by cheque made payable to RDOC and sent c/o 160 Oakridge Blvd., Ottawa, ON K2G 2V2.  Please include a notation that the donation is for Ottawa Pet Oxygen Masks.

For more information, please call 613.228.7764.



Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Graduates

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada is pleased to congratulate recent Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ graduates at Camp Dogwould in Port Elmsley (ON) and Calgary, AB:

Camp Dogwould, Port Elmsley, ON

Beverley Harris and Lena   |   Carol McEwan and Mattea   |   Susan Watt and Freyd

Marion Brenton and Bella   |   Claire Dansereau and Ziggy   |   Bronwyn Hyland and Kepler

Suzie Labelle and Roxy   |   Rocky Bogseth and Pete   |   Gail Giles and Dempsey

Sylvie Reardon and Kayla   |    Laura Smith and Ellie   

Calgary, AB

Adam Dormer and Osirus   |   Lindsay Clayton Dormer and Willow

CONGRATULATIONS!



Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Prep Course and Tests (Ottawa, ON)

The next Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Preparation Course at Forever Friends Dog Training will commence Monday, July 19, 2010.  For more information or to register, contact Forever Friends at 613.727.HEEL.

The next Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Tests are scheduled at Forever Friends Dog Training, 17 Grenfell Crescent, Unit 6, Ottawa, Ontario on the following dates:    August 15     October 17    December 5

The CCGC™ Test scheduled for October 17, 2010 will be offered free to rescue dogs that are awaiting adoption.  Any rescue interested in testing one or more of their rescue dogs should contact RDOC at ccgc@responsibledogowners.ca  to reserve a time.  All dogs must have a vaccination certificate or titer test results indicating appropriate levels of antibodies.  If the dog is successful, a certificate will be issued when the dog is adopted and the owner provides proof of licensing.

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada has CCGC™ Evaluators in Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba and British Columbia.  A list of CCGC™ Evaluators is available at http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/ccgct.html  .

RDOC is recruiting new Evaluators in all provinces and encourages those interested to contact us at ccgc@responsibledogowners.ca  .

A list of all CCGC™ Tests scheduled across Canada is posted on the RDOC website at http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/ccgct.html .



My White Knight and his Black Poodle

by Doreen Davies, Peterborough, ON

“Why are you here?”, asked the doctor.  “Because I can’t sleep!”, I replied.  “Why can’t you sleep?”, asked the doctor.  “Because my dogs have been seized”, I answered.  “Why did they take your dogs?” he asked.  “That is why I can’t sleep! I don’t know why they took my dogs”

My name is Doreen Davies.  This happened to me in Ontario and it could happen to you!

German ShepherdsWords cannot describe that horrific day, one week before Christmas, when the authorities presented a search warrant for puppies and/or a pregnant bitch.  My cherished pets are German Shepherds, are obedience trained, are groomed daily. I had no convictions and no charges were laid against me.  The warrant said that they believe my dogs may cause harm to a person or an animal but, to my knowledge, they had never even seen my dogs.  It seemed like seconds and my three dogs were gone because I was told that I failed to respond to a letter in a timely fashion and because they claimed my dogs were vicious.

I was frantic.  I phoned many lawyers.  None of the lawyers I spoke with in my city had any experience with such matters.  A prominent Toronto lawyer wanted a twenty thousand dollar ($20,000) deposit. Then a member of my local obedience club recommended Terry Green, the senior partner of Green & Vespry Law Offices in Ottawa, Ontario.

I called and Terry Green agreed to take my case.  Sobbing, I asked Terry how I was supposed to prove my innocence.  The authorities wanted to kill my dogs, claiming that I was breeding a vicious line. The authorities did not have to prove my dogs were vicious -- I had to prove they were not.  With astonishing composure, he said, “Pull yourself together, that is my job”.  

My knight in shining armour did not ride a black stallion; he came with a large, black, Standard Poodle named Winston Churchill.  I told him that my dogs had done nothing and he believed me.  Some of my friends were skeptical. They believed I must have done something to bring this upon myself.  

This is Canada and we have rights and freedoms, don’t we?  The authorities can’t raid your home and take your animals unless you have done something, can they? Well, yes, they can!  Under the Dog Owners Liability Act, they can and they do.  Someone need only say that they are afraid of your animals and your dogs can be seized.

After Terry stepped in and negotiated with the authorities, my dogs were released and are now back home.  While I did pay a fine, my dogs were saved and I am forever grateful to Terry Green of Green & Vespry Law Offices in Ottawa.  

If you have any legal problems or issues concerning your dog(s), you can call my white knight with his black poodle. Terry Green can be reached at 613.560.6565 or tjgreen@bellnet.ca .  His calm, caring demeanor and his knowledge of the law will immediately put you at ease and quite possibly save your dog(s).



Teddy Bear Picnic, Ottawa, ON  -  Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)

On July 5th, Responsible Dog Owners of Canada (RDOC) was thrilled to participate in the invited CHEO Teddy Bear Picnic, an annual event hosted by CHEO and The CHEO Foundation as a thank you for the support received from the generous people of eastern Ontario, western Quebec and beyond.

RDOC was invited to promote bite prevention in the Plan It Safe Tent, very close to the B*A*S*H* (Bear Ambulatory Surgical Hospital) Tent, where ill and injured teddy bears were given physical and dental checkups. Some bears and other stuffed animals with fractures were referred to the Ortho Tent for casts.  

Visitors to the RDOC Booth were treated to the antics of Freda, Felix, Flynn and Fran, RDOC’s new puppet members of the Bite Prevention Team. Children also received a copy of Fido, Friend or Foe, an activity book that focuses on bite prevention, crayons and a sticker.  

Fido

Fido, RDOC’s Bite Prevention Mascot, and his handler attended and marched proudly along side of other popular mascots in the CHEO Teddy Bear Parade and then took advantage of some photo ops with quite a few enthusiastic children.

Many thanks go out to Gaylinne Roberts, Amanda Ardley, Bin Xiao, Véronique Perron and MariLyse Dumas, RDOC’s top dog for the Bite Prevention Program, who volunteered during this event.  

For more pictures from the CHEO Teddy Bear Picnic and other events,  see http://rdoc.smugmug.com/ .


Toby, Feature Dog of the MonthToby

In an effort to assist rescues in placing some wonderful animals, RDOC will feature a rescue animal every month on its website.  Rescues interested in participating should contact RDOC at info@responsibledogowners.ca and their name will be added to the list.

Each month the name of a rescue will be drawn and they will be invited to submit a description and picture of the animal they wish us to feature.  

This month, we are featuring Toby from Canadian Hound Rescue; and what a beautiful boy he is!

Toby is a 5 – 7 year old Foxhound/Walker Hound Mix and is a dog to be treasured.  If his cute nose freckles don’t win your heart, his selfless sense of adoration for his people and fellow house pets will.  

TobyThis guy gets along with everyone – cats, kids, puppies, little dogs, big dogs, goats, neighbours - you name it and Toby will be their buddy. Toby is a pleasure to have around the house.  He rarely barks, except while he is playing outside with his foster brother.  He doesn’t challenge the confines of fencing and he shares his food, his bed and his toys.

Toby is completely housetrained and very trustworthy.  He has good manners on a leash.  He doesn’t pull – much – and he is easily redirected.  Tricks are not his forte, but his never ending charm is.  He likes to share your bed or couch, but is not needy or neurotic.  

Toby is approximately 5-7 years old, and truly a pleasure to have around.  Any home will be blessed with his presence.  For more information about Toby or to inquire about adopting this lovely boy, see  http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/15432088  .

 

 


 

2010 Going to the Dogs - Friday September 10   Going to the Dogs

The 5th Annual Going to the Dogs Dinner and Race Night is an evening of fine food, fun and excitement. The evening includes an all-you-can-eat buffet, valet parking, live racing and complimentary race program, $2 wager coupon, $5 Slot Coupon, a silent auction, 50/50 Draw and great door prizes.

Guests must be 19 years of age or older and have a government-issued photo ID.

Advance tickets are available for $40 per person. Tickets must be reserved by September 2, 2010. For more information e-mail info@gttd.org or inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca , or call 613.228.7764.

Proceeds go to Responsible Dog Owners of Canada and Therapeutic Paws of Canada.

Sponsorship Packages

Race sponsorship packages and advertising packages are available at very reasonable prices.  If you are interested, please contact Candice at 613.228.7764 or e-mail coconnell@responsibledogowners.ca  for details.

 

 


 

AWARE FestivalAWARE Festival October 16, 2010 - Rideau Carleton Raceway, Ottawa, Ontario

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada (RDOC) and The Canadian Foundation for Animal-Assisted Support Services (C4ASS) are hosting the AWARE Festival on October 16, 2010, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Rideau Carleton Raceway, Ottawa, ON.

Formerly World Animal Day Celebration, the organizing committee decided a new name was needed to reflect the diverse scope of the event. We are pleased to announce that AWARE Festival (meaning Animal Wellness, Awareness, Rescue and Education) is the new name for this annual event.

Again this year, admission is free and will feature the following:
 

Animal Rescue Walkathon                       

The walkathon is open to all rescues including dogs, cats, horses, ferrets, rabbits, birds and reptiles/amphibians.  Rescues need not be registered but must adhere, in principle, to a standard code of ethics.  All proceeds (minus 5% which will go towards event costs) will be shared equally by the rescues participating.  Rescue application forms and walker pledge sheets are now available.  For forms or more information, please e-mail walkathon@awarefestival.ca  .

 

Blessing               Blessing of the Animals

A blessing of the animals with representatives from a number of denominations, including an Elder from the Algonquin Tribe, will be held in the Winner’s Circle for all animals in attendance.  World Animal Day medallions will be given to the first 200 animals.  

All leashed, tethered or properly contained animals are welcome.

 

Adoption AlleyAdoption

This year Animal Adoption Alley will be located in the Mainline Room (downstairs at the Rideau Carleton Raceway), some rescues with animals for adoption.  

Look for a variety of animal rescues including dog, cat, rabbit, ferret, horse and reptile/amphibian.

Booth space is $10 for rescue organizations.  For more information or to register booth space on Adoption Alley, please e-mail inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca   

 

Company Connections

connectionsVendors and not for profit organizations offering various products, programs and services will also be located in the Mainline Room.  entertainment

Booth space for vendors and other for profit businesses is $50. Booth space for all not for profit organizations is $10.

Note:  All booth space includes a table and chairs.

A number of local bands and musicians will be onsite to entertain throughout the day.

A full-service restaurant and bar is available on site.dining

 

Volunteers are needed for this fun event.  
If you are interested, please contact MariLyse at
marilyse@responsibledogowners.ca
.

 

 

 

Event Sponsorship

Following is a list of sponsorship opportunities that offer excellent exposure to pet owners and others:

Top Dogs $1,500:  Prime booth and banner space, logo and link on the AWARE Festival website, logo in the event program and special mention in the press release.

Hot Dogs $1,000:  Prime booth space, logo and web link on the AWARE Festival website and logo in the event program.

Aristo-cats $500:  Prime booth space and logo and web link on the AWARE Festival website.

Cat-apillars $250:  Prime booth space.

For more information, please see www.awarefestival.ca  or contact Candice at coconnell@responsibledogowners.ca , 613.228.7764.



Second Chance Animal Rescue Society’s  “Tails on the Trails”Tails on the Trails     

Vicki Stafford attended the Second Chance Animal Rescue Society's Annual “Tails on the Trails” Fundraiser. A grand total of $28,000 was raised for SCARS.  Congratulations to the volunteers and the participants.

Vicki owns and operates Sammy’s Pet Boarding in Tails on the TrailsAthabasca, Alberta.  She is a trainer and Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Evaluator.  Vicki is also on the Board of Directors for the Alberta SPCA.  

Anyone looking for a good boarding facility, trainer or a CCGC™ Evaluator can contact Vicki at petboarding@mcsnet.ca  .

 

 



Join Us!

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada (RDOC) is a national not for profit organization that promotes  responsible dog ownership and public safety through education and support.  We cultivate respect for the rights and privileges of all members of society, both dog-owning and non-dog owning.  

RDOC encourages and fosters recognition of the contribution that canines make in society through  companionship, service/assistance and therapy.  And, we strive to assemble a strong network of responsible dog owners to ensure the restoration and preservation of a dog-friendly society.

What’s in it for you?  More and more, dog owners and their dogs are facing radical legislation that limits  the breed of dog, the size of dog and the number of dogs that a person may own.  Dog owners and dogs have become the modern day pariah.  It is time to restore and rebuild the recognition and appreciation of dogs in society.  

Education is the key!  Join us and work together to ensure that dogs continue to be welcome in society.

For more information, contact membership@responsibledogowners.ca



Rainbow Bridge

We wish to extend our sincere and deepest sympathy to Dian McTaggart in the loss of her beloved companion and therapy dog, Sabrina and Betsy Kitchen in the loss of her heart dog, Olive, all of Ottawa, ON.  

Although it's difficult today to see beyond the sorrow,

may looking back in memory help comfort you tomorrow.

Author Unknown


Volunteers Urgently Needed

kittensMore than 250 cats were rescued at the end of May from a difficult situation in Valleyfield, Quebec. Because of the remarkable medical care given by the shelter workers and volunteers, many of the cats are now ready for adoption.   However, volunteers are needed every day of the week to care for the cats, feed them, and clean the cages.

The reward?  Cuddling with a purring machine or two and that great feeling you get when you do something to help a creature in need.

Several RDOC members, including MariLyse Dumas, RDOC’s Vice Chair and Director, Education, regularly volunteer, usually Thursdays, and can give you a ride if you are willing to share the cost of gas which is approximately $30 per trip. The more volunteers, the less the cost.  kittens

MariLyse’s car is very comfortable and air conditioned. Departure time from Ottawa is 7:15 a.m., returning from Valleyfield at 3:00 p.m. Anyone interested should contact MariLyse at marilyse@responsibledogowners.ca .

Supplies are still very much needed.  In particular, cat food, arctic fleece, cat houses and scratching posts would be greatly appreciated.

Many of the cats and kittens are now available for adoption.  If you are interested in volunteering or adoption, please contact sschecter@videotron.ca  . The SPCA shelter is located at 2555 Boulevard Monsigneur Langlois, Valleyfield, Quebec.

Note:   Responsible Dog Owners of Canada supports and promotes the humane treatment and rescue of all animals in need.
  


 

newsletter gif    Volume 12,  Issue 1 – Spring 2010  .....   you can also download this newsletter  in PDF format

In This Issue:

photos from the Fido Magic Show

Photos :  left - Michael Bourada; top - Yvonne Robertson, MariLyse Dumas & Julie More;
right - MariLyse Dumas, Fido and Allan Martin, and bottom - Constable Boomer

 

“Fido, Friend or Foe?” Launched – Ottawa, ON

On April 3, 2010, Responsible Dog Owners of Canada launched “Fido, Friend or Foe?”, a new children’s activity book that focuses on bite prevention.  

Children and parents delighted at the magic and illusions of Michael Bourada and the antics of Allan Martin and Constable Boomer. They were charmed by Fido, RDOC’s Bite Prevention Mascot, and thrilled with the artistry of Brad the Balloon Guy.  

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada wishes to thank the City of Ottawa By-law and Regulatory Services and Critter Jungle, see www.critterjungle.com  for their participation and sponsorship of this event.

Watch for another

Fido Magic Show in 2011!



Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Graduates  (Ottawa, ON)

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada is pleased to congratulate recent Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ graduates in Ottawa (ON):

Laura Skjenna and Spike, Ottawa, ON
Jean Madmakichuk and Cha Cha, Ottawa, ON

Special thanks go out to Cheryl Smith, Finola Pitcher and Meghan Scott of Forever Friends Dog Training in Ottawa, Andrea Cormack-Akeson and volunteer assistants, Lorraine Green, Caitlin Green, Julie More and MariLyse Dumas.

Congratulations!


 

Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Tests  (Ottawa, ON)

The Canadian Canine Good Citizen™ Tests for 2010 will be held at Forever Friends Dog Training, 17 Grenfell Crescent, Unit 6, Ottawa, Ontario on the following dates: 

June 27       August 15       October 17      December 5

 

The CCGC™ Test scheduled for October 17, 2010 will be offered free to rescue dogs that are awaiting adoption.  Any rescue interested in testing one or more of their rescue dogs should contact RDOC at ccgc@responsibledogowners.ca to reserve a time.  All dogs must have a vaccination certificate or titer test results indicating appropriate levels of antibodies.  If the dog is successful, a certificate will be issued when the dog is adopted and the owner provides proof of licensing. 

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada has CCGC™ Evaluators in Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba and British Columbia.  A list of CCGC™ Evaluators is available at http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/ccgct.html .

RDOC is recruiting new Evaluators in all provinces and encourages those interested to contact us at ccgc@responsibledogowners.ca .

A list of all CCGC™ Tests scheduled across Canada is posted on the RDOC website at http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/ccgct.html .



Spring Poop Harvest, Ottawa, Ontario

Clean Up After Your PetYes, it’s that time again and it looks like this winter produced a bumper crop.

The Conroy Pit clean up is scheduled for Saturday, April 24th, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. and the Bruce Pit clean up is set for Sunday, April 25th, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

We need a few volunteers to help distribute the bags and gloves. If you are interested in helping out at either location, please call 613-228-7764 or e-mail us at inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca .

Students who need volunteer hours for their community work credits are also welcome.

In the meantime, we remind everyone that cleaning up after your pet is not only the law but it is important to protect everyone, including you and your pet.



Annual General Meeting 
 

The RDOC annual general meeting is scheduled for Sunday, June 20th, 2:00 to 6:00 p.m. at the Ottawa Citizen Conference Center, 1101 Baxter Road.   

A guest speaker from Canine Water Wellness will be there to explain the health and recreational benefits of water therapy for your dog.  Light refreshments will be served.

clipart - hydrotherapy

 



Pet First Aid Course – June 12 & 13, 2010 (Ottawa, ON)

clipart - First Aid

Would you know what to do?  A certified pet first aid course could mean the difference between life and death!

You are at home or on vacation and your pet suddenly exhibits signs of illness or injury. An emergency can happen any time or any place. Your veterinarian is not available or hours away. Would you know what to do?

First aid is the primary step in any emergency situation for people and pets alike and having first aid knowledge could mean the difference between life and death.

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada will host its second internationally recognized Pet First Aid Course on June 12 & 13, 2010, instructed by Dawn O'Leary, a certified pet first aid instructor with Walks 'N' Wags. The course will be held at Forever Friends Dog Training School, 17 Grenfell Crescent, Unit 6, Ottawa, ON.

The course will cover important topics such as immediate steps to take in an emergency, how to handle bleeding wounds and bone injuries, how to perform Artificial Respiration and CPR and what to do for poisoning and heat/cold injuries. Other subjects in the course include how to recognize signs of numerous illnesses and parasites, with an emphasis on methods of preventing illness and injury for both dogs and cats.

The price per student is $210, which includes all course materials, exam, certificate, beverages and snacks and a lunch on Sunday, June 13th.  

As only 16 students will be accepted for this course, pet owners are encouraged to register early. If you are interested in registering for this comprehensive pet first aid course, please contact Responsible Dog Owners at inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca or call 613.228.7764.



image - dog swimmingChoosing the "Right" Dog … Ask a Trainer

by Nan Arthur, CDBC, CPDT, KPACTP

Summertime is often the time when the image of children and dogs romping together in tall fields of grass, or splashing together in lapping ocean waves sends people in search of a dog to share in their lives. Of course, there are far more reasons for people to want to add a dog to their household than to share with children, but there isa common goal of finding “the perfect dog.”

In their search for the “perfect” dog, many people walk into shelters and contact rescue groups with visions of adopting the dog of their dreams. While on this quest to find the perfect match, many have a list of requirements that includes a dog that is loyal, easy to care for, already housetrained, and one that will not interrupt their life-style.

Unfortunately, if these are the only considerations in choosing a dog, you might be coming away from an adoption with a dog that is not appropriate for you or your lifestyle, and could leave you sadly disappointed in the entire process.

There is no such creature as “the perfect dog”, unless it's a stuffed toy; but it is possible to find the “right” dog for most homes and living conditions by setting and sticking to the criteria designed before you go looking.

How to Decide

Choosing the right dog isn't (and shouldn't be) as simple as “He's cute”, “She's the right size”, or “I like the breed.” Many considerations should be examined before making this important and long-term decision.

First, adopting a dog should be for the animal's entire lifetime. Dogs should not be any more disposable than children. Anyone considering dog companionship should not only understand this, they should enlighten themselves to the shocking animal shelter euthanasia figures that reach millions upon millions each year in the United States.

Next, adding an animal to your household should not be a hurried decision. This decision will have a life-style-changing outcome, and careful, educated planning is necessary for the safety and happiness of the adopter, the dog and ultimately the community. Take your time.

Getting Started

After you consider your environment — things such as the size of yards and proper fencing, or neighbors — finding the "right" dog for your household can be somewhat narrowed down to the following:

With this basic list as a starting place, you can now further examine each point in detail to see, not only if you are looking for the proper dog, but if you should be looking at all.

Breed

clipart - group of dogsIf you have a specific breed in mind, you will need to consider what the dog was bred for and how far out of his or her element the dog might be in your home. For example, if the dog was bred for herding (German Shepherds, Collies, Corgis, Australian Shepherds, etc.) and you live in an apartment or have a small yard and limited time to devote to the animal, you might not appreciate the results when the dog finds a “job” to satisfy his need to work. A herding dog doesn't have to “herd” to be happy, but they will need things to do that can direct all that intense energy.


 

Time

The amount of time you have to devote to a dog should always be considered before making your final decision. If you are thinking about a puppy, but you work eight hours a day — think again! A young puppy has limited bladder control, is teething and will have lots of energy that needs to be directed into positive behavior. It's unfair to leave a puppy unattended for long periods of time. Puppies need to be considered as fragile as babies, and most sane people wouldn't consider leaving a baby unattended for even small time periods. Many older dogs are already housetrained and ready to kick back, and often are overlooked, but sometimes would make a better choice for busy people.

All dogs need quality interaction with their families (the humans) if you expect a well-behaved, happy dog.

Motive 

image - Best FriendsIf children are your motivation for getting a dog, you have an even greater responsibility. You need to take extra care and consideration in choosing the personality of the animal, as well as the breed and size of a dog. A dog that has a high energy level by nature might be able to keep up with an energetic family but may require more time and training to channel that enthusiasm into positive activities. A larger animal might be strong enough to knock over and hurt a small child if the dog has not been trained to understand space boundaries.

You should also ask yourself if you expect your children to "take care of the dog." If so, you are going to be disappointed, and the dog is going to suffer. Children cannot be expected to give full-time care to a dog. All too often, dogs are brought to the shelter after a failed attempt at teaching a child "responsibility." It's better to teach by example, or give a child extra chores than to risk the very life of an animal. If the children are adolescents it’s always best to consider if a new driver’s license is going to compete with the care of a dog in a few years, not to mention busy schedules of teenagers today.

If your motive is to give an existing dog a companion because your dog is displaying negative behavior such as digging or barking, then you may just compound the problem. Adding another dog could double your trouble! Remember, a second dog will need as much attention as the established dog, so if you don't have time for the first dog, you won't have time for another.

Commitment  

Are you willing to make a lifetime commitment to a dog? The average dog lives between 10 to 14 years; and in that time he will need regular veterinarian care, a commitment to exercise, and lots of love. Vet bills can add up to some formidable figures over the lifetime of a dog, so a realistic idea of this care should be considered.

Planning

Have you given any thought to unforeseen problems that may arise during the course of a dog's life? What will you do with the dog during vacations or if you become ill? Is there a safe place or a responsible person you can rely upon in case of an emergency?

What about the dog as it ages? Will you still be able to care for your dog as he/she gets older and changes both physically and emotionally? Just like people, some dogs will change in personality, lose bladder and/or bowel control, have health problems, and are less playful as they age. Shelters have far too many older animals that were relinquished because the dog started "costing" money. There is nothing sadder than elderly dogs mourning for their owners after they have been left alone in such a frightening and unfamiliar place after years of devotion.

After you and your family have carefully considered all of these points, you should be ready to begin searching for a dog to add to your family. Make sure you receive input from everyone that will be involved with the dog, and bring along someone that will help you stick to your criteria. A cute puppy face or a wildly wagging tail has caught the eye of many potential adopters, only to turn into a disaster for the dog and family after the animal was unable to fit into a particular life-style.

Read more articles by Nan Arthur at www.wholedogtraining.com

Accepting your life-style limitations, understanding your motives, and choosing a dog that you have time to satisfy his or her instinctual elements requires some thought and planning, but bringing the "right" dog into your family will deliver a lifetime of love and devotion, and ultimately you will have the "perfect" dog for you.



Guide to Grooming - Spring 2010

 by Laureen Osborne

clipart - groomingIt’s that time of year again; muddy paws and overgrown coat on your dog.  You may have let your dog’s coat grow over the winter (to keep him warm) and now you are thinking of taking him in to the groomer for a clip down. The only problem is, he sometimes comes back with a pretty short haircut!  Your best solution to the “shortie” haircut is to keep up with your dog’s grooming over winter. He should still be trimmed regularly, just not as short as in summer.

Try to brush your dog before taking him in for grooming. The groomer may then be able to leave a little more coat on him.  You can ask your groomer to trim your dog’s leg and chest furnishings shorter this time of year. She can also clip the inside of his legs and his tummy, where it won’t show. This will make it easier to keep him clean.

As for muddy paws, place a basin of warm water beside the entrance door. When he comes back from his walk, dip each paw in the basin and dry with a towel.  It is not necessary, or advisable, to continually bathe your dog when all he really needs is his feet and undercarriage to be cleaned.  A lot of dirt, including mud, will come off without bathing. Simply allow your dog to dry and then brush him.

Laureen Osborne is a Master Groomer and author of one of the best grooming books in Canada, "The Pet Owner’s Guide to Dog Grooming", available at  www.Larkspurpublications.com .

Join Laureen for Pet Grooming 101 on April 30, 2010, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Carolark, 600 Eagleson Road, Kanata, Cost $20 per person.  This is a fundraiser for the OHS Building Fund.

To register call (613) 591-3277 or fax (613) 591-0419.  For more information, see http://www.responsibledogowners.ca/events-2.html#grooming101 .

 



The Rainbow Bridge

We wish to extend our sincere and deepest sympathy to Sylvie Rouleau in the loss of her cherished girl, Button, Lisa Kelly in the loss of her much loved friend, Roxy, Mary and Chris Buell in the loss of their loyal boy, Phil, Tami Kempton in the loss of her treasured companion, Bruce and Ralph Barr and Caitlin Green in the loss of their beloved Daisy.    

Although it's difficult today to see beyond the sorrow,

May looking back in memory help comfort you tomorrow.

Author Unknown


 

clipart - sunset    
       River Dog Sunset Cruise

 

 

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada is hosting its first “River Dog Sunset Cruise” in Ottawa, ON on June 19, 2010, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

In celebration of Father’s Day and everything fun, we invite you to cruise and dance your way down the Ottawa River on the Paula D.  There will be a cash bar and light refreshments.  

Relax and enjoy a leisurely cruise, watch the twinkling stars, or dance the night away under the moonlight.  Whatever you do, it is sure to be a fun evening.

Advance tickets are now available for $25 per person.  For more information, call 613.228.7764 or e-mail inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca .



Have a Story?   Submissions are Welcome!

We would love to hear from our members or other dog enthusiasts across Canada.  If you have an article or a story that you would like to share, please forward to inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca .  The next issue of The Dog Guardian will be published on or about July 15, 2010.

 



RDOC is on Yahoo and Facebook

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada now has a Yahoo Forum and welcomes dog owners across Canada to exchange anecdotes and information on anything about dogs.

To subscribe to the Yahoo Forum send an e-mail to ResponsibleDogOwners-subscribe@yahoogroups.ca

The Responsible Dog Owners of Canada Facebook Group can be found at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=8184353329.

 

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada (RDOC)

Responsible Dog Owners of Canada is a registered non profit organization that promotes responsible dog ownership through education and support, cultivates respect for the rights and privileges of members of  the dog-owning and non dog-owning communities, fosters recognition of the contribution that canines make through companionship, service/assistance and therapy and aspires to assemble a strong network of responsible dog owners to ensure the restoration and preservation of a dog-friendly society.

Responsibility   ·    Respect   ·   Recognition

 

Contact RDOC  by:
E-mail:
inquiries@responsibledogowners.ca
Phone:
613.206.6885

 

Write to us at:
9 Liette Ct., RR1, Kemptville, ON K0G 1J0

Or visit us online at:
www.responsibledogowners.ca

 

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